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New July 2013

City parents must focus on character not achievement, says group founder

<!– google_ad_section_start –> “When you find your children doing everything against what you ask, it could be a warning sign that there’s something wrong with the relationship between you and your kids,” says Josephine Ling Yip Lai-sim, founder of non-profit organisation Hong Kong Character City Movement. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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At stroke of midnight, Britain holds its first same-sex weddings

Britain’s new marriage law came into effect Saturday

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How NBCUniversal Killed DailyCandy

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Dany Levy, the founder of DailyCandy, the addictive and once wildly successful shopping e-newsletter and website, was boarding a plane to Mexico when she heard her creation was being shut down by its current owner, NBCUniversal, along with Television Without Pity (the beloved site that launched a thousand TV recappers). Levy admits to mixed feelings. “I kind of thought … More »

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Airbnb Is Suddenly Begging New York City to Tax Its Hosts $21 Million

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Now that Airbnb is a $10 billion soon-to-be-public corporation, the outlaw of the sharing economy is trying to go legit at the expense of its hosts. Literally.Read more…

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Farmers and eaters: Why can’t we be friends?

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A farmer from Iowa recently told me a story about visiting the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live. He chatted up foodsellers at the Ferry Building farmers market, visited the wine country, and met a lot of nice people. But he also noticed that whenever he told anyone that he was a corn and soybean farmer, the temperature in the room seemed to drop. Oh, that kind of farmer. In the Bay Area, saying “I grow corn and soy” is the real world version of saying Voldemort. This antipathy runs both ways, of course. Visiting Iowa, I felt a similar chill at times when I revealed that I was a California food writer. Another farmer asked me how I thought we should deal with the problem of people demanding organic foods. But I truly believe that we’re natural allies. The farmer and the eater should be friends! We all want the same thing: A sustainable system, one that provides fair compensation for food producers and makes the world a more healthy, delicious, and beautiful place with every bite. We should be breaking the path toward this goal together. And yet, instead of mutual respect, there’s acrimony, suspicion, and anger. Somehow we’ve gotten ourselves stuck, like a pair of feuding siblings, in a downward spiral where every attempt at good will comes across as an insult. For years farmers have been suffering under the crushing imperative from eaters to reduce prices. Farm customers never cared if the farmer had to cut down the old woodlot, or drain the pond where generations of kids have fished, or sell out to her neighbor; all they ever saw was a price sticker with a number on it. And in the past, we’ve just searched out the lowest number we could find. Now, that’s changing. People are starting to say, “You know, we really should be paying for the true cost of food.” The response from conventional farmers: “Pay more for food? That’s elitist.” Farmers complain that eaters are wildly misinformed, and ignorant to the realities of agriculture. And that, I have to say, is often true: If we’re not savvy, the money we’re willing to spend is liable to go to the slickest marketing illusion, instead of actually paying for healthier, more environmentally friendly food. But here again, farmers and eaters are united in their goals. Farmers want their customers to truly understand what they are doing on their farms. At the same time, eaters are practically breaking down the barn doors because we’re (finally!) desperate to understand what’s going on with our food. It seems like the solution would be to throw open those doors. Or we could just go the opposite direction and ban recording on farms, because, you know, whatever. Let’s review: Foodies want to pay a fair price for food, farmers want to earn a fair price. Farmers want people to understand what they are doing, and eaters are eager to learn. What exactly was the problem here? If we can take two steps back like this, it all seems obvious. But down in the trenches it’s much more confusing. People from my part of the world tend to like farmers, we just think that the conventional ones have been brainwashed and are in the thrall of giant agricultural corporations. And, in turn, conventional farmers tend to think that organically inclined eaters are basically good people who have been duped by a gigantic advertising apparatus. I want to suggest, very gently, that both are a little bit right. There are plenty of people out there who have literally bet the farm on expensive new equipment, who now must defend their form of agriculture — in opposition, if need be, to the best evidence. And there are plenty of eaters who become fixated on one particular chemical, or on GMOs, or on a fad nutrient, instead of looking holistically at what’s best for their health and the heath of the land. Yes, there’s a giant sloshing sea of misinformation, and yes, sometimes it seems as if eaters and farmers are more interested in confirming their prejudices than actually listening to one another. The first step here is the same one you’d have to take as feuding siblings: Someone has to swallow their pride. When someone from either side asks me how they can get the other to listen to reason, I always tell them they are asking the wrong question. If you want someone to listen to you, you first have to listen to them, and listen closely. This can be hard: Farmers and eaters are separated, not just ideologically, but also geographically — and that gulf is widest between the big coast cities and the big plains farms. It’s hard to start a conversation from 1,000 miles away. But it’s not at all impossible: There are a few conduits connecting thoughtful farmers to thoughtful eaters, and you happen to be reading one now. As an eater, I want my food dollar to go to good stewards of the land, to build strong towns full of healthy people, to make a greener, more delectable future. What I’d like to know from farmers is, how can I best support you to achieve those goals? I’m listening.Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Food, Living

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The Best of Hobby Lobby Versus the Supreme Court&#39;s Women

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Hobby Lobby went to the Supreme Court yesterday as part of the craft company’s ongoing quest to deny its female employees Affordable-Care-Act-mandated birth-control coverage. And the women on the bench were, as my mother would say, Not Impressed.Read more…

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SEC Bows to Dark Money

The SEC avoided taking a stand on corporations having to disclose their political contributions. What it means for transparency in our democracy.

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Large Companies Prepared to Pay Price on Carbon

More than two dozen major American corporations are preparing to pay climate-related taxes, departing from conservative orthodoxy and exposing divisions between the Republican Party and its business supporters.

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DealBook: New Corporate Tax Shelter: A Merger Abroad

More large American corporations are reducing their tax bill by buying a foreign company and effectively renouncing their United States citizenship.

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DealBook: 5 Accused in Biggest Data Breach and Hacking Case in U.S.

Prosecutors said a scheme targeting more than a dozen corporations brought losses that ran into the hundreds of millions of dollars.

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G-20 Backs Plan to Curb Tax Evasion by Large Corporations

The plan targets only corporations and would, if adopted widely, shift some of the global tax burden away from small businesses and individuals.

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G20 Backs Fundamental Reform of Corporate Taxation

The Group of 20 nations on Friday indicated support for new rules on taxing multinational corporations, taking aim at loopholes used to avoid billions of dollars in taxes.

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Chinese community struggles to ride out the strain in Spain

<!– google_ad_section_start –> The second of a two-part series on China’s growing influence in Europe looks at professionals facing the cold stares of a cynical Spain. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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Tiny Chinese enclave remakes gambling world, Vegas

<!– google_ad_section_start –> LAS VEGAS (AP) — Most people still think of the U.S. gambling industry as anchored in Las Vegas. They might think of vestiges of the mob, or the town’s ill-advised flirtation with family-friendly branding in the 1990s. But they would be wrong. The center of the gambling world has shifted 16 time zones away to a tiny spit of land on the southern tip of East Asia. An hour’s ferry ride from Hong Kong and an afternoon flight from half the world’s population, Macau is the only place in China where casino gambling is legal. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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Apple plans Nevada solar farm in clean energy push

<!– google_ad_section_start –> Apple said it plans to build a new solar farm with NV Energy Inc for power supply to its new data centre in Reno, Nevada, a major step towards its goal of having its data centres run on renewable energy. Apple and other technology companies such as Amazon.com and Microsoft, that build and run computer server farms have come under criticism for their high consumption of electricity and other resources. These data centres cater to an explosion in Internet traffic, streaming content through mobile devices and hosting of services to corporations. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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Call for global information system to curb tax evasion

<!– google_ad_section_start –> The leading developed nations have called for the creation of a global system to automatically funnel financial information about individuals and companies using offshore tax havens, but Switzerland does not want to co-operate. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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China must investigate links between White House and businesses: expert

<!– google_ad_section_start –> Bloomberg yesterday quoted a source as saying that following an attack on his company by Chinese hackers in 2010, Sergey Brin, Google’s co-founder, was provided with highly sensitive US government intelligence linking the attack to a specific unit of the People’s Liberation Army, China’s military. Brin was given a temporary classified clearance to sit on the briefing by US intelligence officials. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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America, Inc. at it’s Finest

Saks Fifth Avenue
7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Bren-Books.com, Modern first editions and collectible fiction<

bren-books.com, Modern first editions and collectible fiction

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J&R Computer/Music World
Burberry
New July 2013