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New July 2013

Veep Recap: Children Are of No Value

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Veep ventures to some dark territory this week. First we get a glimmer of hope: Selina has values! She has, like, actual political priorities. There are things that she cares about, things of substance, of depth, things that affect the normals! One of those things is universal child care, which … More »

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Runaway Teen Survives 5-Hour Flight to Hawaii in Plane’s Wheel Well

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A 16-year-old boy somehow survived a five and a half hour flight halfway across the Pacific Ocean—from San Jose to Maui—while stowed away in a passenger jet’s wheel well.Read more…

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Escaped rhea ‘death threat issued’

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People trying to find an escaped 2m-tall bird capable of running at 40mph say they have received a threat to kill it.

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Mother tells of lion park ordeal

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A mother tells of her family’s lucky escape after their car caught fire in the lion enclosure at Longleat Safari Park.

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Labour hires Obama poll guru Axelrod

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David Axelrod, the strategist who masterminded Barack Obama’s presidential victories, will be a key adviser on Ed Miliband’s 2015 general election campaign, the Labour Party says.

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Colombia to honour Garcia Marquez

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Colombia announces its own ceremony to honour author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who was cremated in Mexico, where he lived for more than 30 years.

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The week in GIFs: Mark Ruffalo edition

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Mark Ruffalo won our “Who’s your fave green celeb” poll, plus we’re way overdue to stare at gifs of him. Power plants lost their legal bid to douse you with mercury: TumblrThere’s now a gnat named after Bill McKibben: TumblrThe IPCC report was censored: Fracking can make you sick in a number of different ways: TumblrVermont is about to mandate GMO labels on food: GiphyAir pollution disproportionately affects people of color (even though they aren’t causing as much of it): TumblrAirbnb can make your dreams of running a brothel come true: TumblrThanks for being awesome, Ruff. GiphyFiled under: Living

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Newly discovered gnat species named after Bill McKibben

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If you had the power to name a living creature, would you use that power wisely? Would you name it after one of your heroes? Let’s be real: Beyoncemus knowlesi does have a pretty nice ring to it! Peter Kerr, a scientist with the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s State Collection of Arthropods, recently discovered a species of gnat. Through a great feat of willpower, he was able to avoid the temptation of christening it Gnat King Cole, Jr. (There’s a reason that Grist staff members aren’t scientists.) Instead, he decided to name it after foremost green activist, author, and Grist board member Bill McKibben, honoring McKibben’s commitment to protecting the health of the planet and all of its forms of life. The Megophthalmidia mckibbeni makes its home in California. It enjoys fungi, forests, and following 350.org on Twitter. Just kidding about the last one – gnats can’t use smartphones, guys! We reached out to McKibben to find out how he felt when he learned about his new spirit animal. He was predictably modest: “I felt truly honored. I love this planet we got born onto, from the big down to the very small. To be officially connected with its great diversity – well, that means a lot.” And as it turns out, McKibben has a lot in common with this insect: “I was born in California, and my father was a member of the Sierra Club back when it was mostly a hiking group, spending his weekends in the mountains and forests, so I feel some extra kinship. And I love mushrooms too. I wouldn’t dare try to pick them myself, but I’ve never met one I didn’t find delicious.” Sounds like a good match! Well done, Peter Kerr.Filed under: Article, Living

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Airbnb can make your dreams of running a brothel come true

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Thought you were renting your place so an exhausted sightseer could crash? Oh, she’s definitely sleeping … with some horndog and his hundos. In an unexpected result of the sharing economy, Airbnb rooms might be replacing NYC hotels as primo sex worker spots. As one anonymous 21-year-old escort told the New York Post: It’s more discreet and much cheaper than The Waldorf. Hotels have doormen and cameras. They ask questions. Apartments are usually buzz-in. Her escort agency rents apartments for a week at a time through Airbnb, she told the Post, then cycles sex workers and their clients through. The agency avoids detection (or it did til recently) by having the ladies pay for the rooms with their personal plastic. Clever yet illegal! Sure, the sharing economy functions under the assumption that others will use your lawnmower, car, or apartment as gently and upstandingly as you do, and one Post report doesn’t mean you necessarily have to sideeye every pillow in your pad. But carnal embraces are bound to take place in rented rooms, hotel or Airbnb, pro bono or on spec. So if you aren’t cool with finding 10 used condoms and baby wipes at your place (or worse), as a New Yorker in the Post story did, maybe don’t put your home on Airbnb.Filed under: Cities, Living

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Screw being ladylike on a bike

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Turns out the sexist soap bubble we live in doesn’t pop when you hop on a Surly. If anything, people get MORE judgey: Ladies, you better not get to work sweaty and unpretty! But how dare you ride in a skirt and heels? I half expect some guy with a handlebar mustache to promote riding sidesaddle. (Lest you think we live in a post-gender society, know that women in the U.S. only take 1-in-4 bike trips.) Former Grist editor Sarah Goodyear reached out to female cyclists, asking what it means to be feminine on two wheels (if there even IS such a thing). Reading the smattering of responses she got over at Atlantic Cities was both reassuring and eye-opening, reinforcing that there’s no one way to be a woman on a bike, just as — WAIT FOR IT — there’s no one way to be a human on Planet Earth. (Crazy, I know.) Here are a handful of ruminations on cycling, fashion, and gender (all of which you should read, BTW): “I like to hope that I’m changing/expanding the perception of what is feminine when I zip around on my bike while wearing a dress.” — Emily “It’s not that I want to avoid looking feminine, but that I want to be seen primarily as a cyclist. Yes, I’m a woman who rides, but how often do we talk about masculinity and riding?” –Caitlin Cohn “I weird people out when I show up in a public space and take off half my layers. Women are expected to show up to places already presentable.” –Melody Hoffman “I was always turned off by the pandering-seeming marketing of ‘feminine’ bike products: cute cruisers, wicker baskets, and that ‘I’m just always constantly biking to some cutesy-picnic-date’ vibe … ‘Feminine’ can be having really strong, shapely legs! ‘Feminine’ can be taking up less physical space, using less fossil fuel, and caring about the environment!” –Ruby Gertz “Cycling is one of life’s greatest joys for me. I couldn’t care less what it implies about my femininity.” –Nsedef YEAH. So eff gender expectations of being sporty or sexy or both. Wear what you want; just get your feet on the pedals!Filed under: Cities, Living

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Is climate change the new slavery?

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The latest report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is out, with its layers of deadening bureaucratic prose. Climate watchers have had their latest chance to make out, as best they can, what biblical futures await us on a hotter, drier, stormier planet. Two sentences from the report’s second installment struck me with the force of a storm surge: “Climate change is projected to progressively increase inter-annual variability of crop yields in many regions. These projected impacts will occur in the context of rapidly rising crop demand.” Translation: We’ll have smaller harvests in the future, less food, and 3 billion more mouths to feed. The IPCC has done an heroic job of digesting thousands of scientific papers into a bullet-point description of how global warming is shrinking food and water supplies, most drastically for the poorest of Earth’s 7 billion human inhabitants. Being scientists, though, they fail miserably to communicate the gravity of the situation. The IPPC language, at its most vivid, talks of chronic “poverty traps” and “hunger hotspots” as the 21st century unfolds. The report offers not a single graspable image of what our future might actually look like when entire populations of people — not only marginalized sub-groups — face perennial food insecurity and act to save themselves. What decisions do human communities make en masse in the face of total environmental collapse? There are no scientific papers to tell us this, so we must look to history instead for clues to our dystopian future. The last global climate crisis for which we have substantial historical records began 199 years ago this month, in April 1815, when the eruption of Mt. Tambora in Indonesia cooled the Earth and triggered drastic disruptions of major weather systems worldwide. Extreme volcanic weather — droughts, floods, storms — gripped the globe for three full years after the eruption. In the Tambora period from 1815 to 1818, the global human community consisted mostly of subsistence farmers, who were critically vulnerable to sustained climate deterioration. The occasional crop failure was part of life, but when relentless bad weather ruined harvests for two and then three years running, extraordinary, world-changing things started to happen. The magnitude and variety of human suffering in the years 1815 to 1818 are in one sense incalculable, but three continental-scale consequences stand out amid the misery: slavery, refugeeism, and the failure of states. Across what was then the Dutch East Indies, the rice crop failed for multiple years following Tambora’s eruption. In response, the common people did what they always did when faced with starvation: They sold themselves into slavery, by the tens of thousands. In faraway China, desperate parents likewise sold their children in pop-up slave markets. Across the globe, starving peasants abandoned their homes, roaming the countryside in search of food, or begging in the market towns. Irish famine refugees, numbering in the tens of thousands, were met by armed militias at the gates of towns whose inhabitants feared a kind of zombie invasion by human skeletons carrying disease. In France, tourists mistook beggars on the road for armies on the march. Meanwhile, governments everywhere feared rebellion, so they closed borders and shut down the press. Europe witnessed an upsurge of end-of-the-world cults. In southwest China, Yunnan province suffered total civic breakdown post-Tambora, only to remake itself as a rogue narco-state, new hub of the booming international opium trade. These are the sorts of world-altering disaster scenarios the IPCC’s board of scientist-bureaucrats fail to mention in their latest report. But then, climate change has never had its own proper language, a language commensurate with the threat it represents, a language that would forcefully express what it is: the great humanitarian crisis of the 21st century. To invent a language for climate change, we might start with the historical analogy of slavery, which flourished during the Tambora climate emergency two centuries ago. Like our future under climate change, slavery was a human-designed global tragedy that lasted centuries, displaced tens of millions of people, and reorganized the wealth and demographics of the planet. Like climate change, slavery institutionalized the suffering of millions of people from the global south so that folks in Europe and North America (and China) might lead more comfortable, fulfilling lives. And like climate change, few people at the time saw slavery as a serious problem. Even those who did believed nothing could be done without bringing about global economic ruin. That exact argument is used today to defend the continuation of our fossil-fuelled societies. Related Articles:Please, scientists: Tell us how you really feel about climate changeHenry David Thoreau would have given “12 Years a Slave” the Oscar for best picture, tooBlood on the leaves: The hidden environmental story in “12 Years a Slave”Some historians have argued that it was the harnessing of carbon energy — not the abolitionists — that truly made an end to slavery possible in the 19th century. But in a dark historical irony, that same carbon energy, as a pollutant altering the chemistry of the atmosphere and oceans, is now ushering in a new era of global slavery. Millions this century, living and yet unborn, face displaced lives without hope or freedom of choice, only desperate hardship, due to haywire changes in weather patterns. Does that make climate change the new slavery? One thing we can say with “high confidence,” to use the lingo of the IPCC, is that even now — as the U.N. panel marks its quarter-century anniversary with its fifth and most dire report — there is no international climate change movement comparable to abolitionism. For one thing, we don’t even have a name for the millions of people across the world who are passionately committed to the cause of averting climate disaster. Even Bill McKibben, probably the most effective climate activist in the United States, when branding his organization, could do no better than a number — 350, the parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere we need to return to for climate safety. Given that climate activism is faring so badly in the public-relations stakes, perhaps it’s time to brush off the old slogan that worked so famously well for the abolitionists, the rallying cry of the greatest humanitarian victory of all time: “Am I not a Man and a Brother?” And instead of an African in chains above the caption, let’s show a crowd of faces from Africa, Asia, the Pacific, the Caribbean, the Middle East, and the Arctic north — the faces you won’t find in the IPCC’s report, but who are stubbornly real nevertheless, living precariously in their millions on the shifting global frontlines of climate change.Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy

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Billy Zabka on How I Met Your Mother, the Zabkatage, and Sweeping the Leg

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Few actors have portrayed a bully quite as convincingly as William Zabka, a.k.a. Billy Zabka. Starting with 1984’s The Karate Kid, in which he played Johnny Lawrence, a headband-wearing rich kid making life a living hell for Ralph Macchio’s pipsqueak underdog, Zabka became Hollywood’s go-to preppy goon, also stealing scenes … More »

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Have You Had an Excruciating Conversation About Porn With Your Teen?

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Naked men. Naked women. Naked dogs. All together, on the internet, fucking one another. As a parent, you know that your teen has probably watched thousands of hours of online M-F-Dog porn. But have you talked to them about it yet? Read more…

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Nurse Jackie Renewed for 7th Season

Showtime has renewed Nurse Jackie for a seventh season, the network announced today. Jackie’s sixth season starts April 13, so this is a pretty early renewal by Showtime standards. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Peter Facinelli will not be a regular on season seven, which is probably a good thing, … More »

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America, Inc. at it’s Finest

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7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
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Burberry
New July 2013