7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Burberry
US iTunes, App Store, iBookstore, and Mac App Store
7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Rebecca Taylor
7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Saks Fifth Avenue
New July 2013

District councillors slam plan to rezone Stanley sites for luxury flats

<!– google_ad_section_start –> District councillors have criticised the government’s plan to rezone two green-belt sites in Stanley for luxury flats as selling public resources to the wealthy. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

Continue reading District councillors slam plan to rezone Stanley sites for luxury flats

Rich countries: Sure, climate change will screw poor countries, but what about us?

Thumbnail

The new report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights that we are already feeling the pain of global warming across the planet. Heat waves and drought are increasingly in rhythm in every major continent, including our own, while severe flooding is more frequently becoming the business in Africa. If you don’t want to read the IPCC’s 2,500-plus page report, here’s the shorter version: Climate fuckery is not futuristic; we have been fucking up the atmosphere; it is fucking us back. But, as I wrote recently, there are certain people — particularly those with large concentrations of melanin in their skin, and smaller concentrations of money in the bank — who are suffering more of that fuckery than their less-melanated, more-resourced counterparts. The IPCC’s latest makes note of this. Disturbingly, the report’s authors wanted to keep this critical information out of the much-shorter IPCC executive summary — the part that’s supposed to be the most accessible to the public and lawmakers. From New York Times reporter Justin Gillis: The poorest people in the world, who have had virtually nothing to do with causing global warming, will be high on the list of victims as climatic disruptions intensify, the report said. It cited a World Bank estimate that poor countries need as much as $100 billion a year to try to offset the effects of climate change; they are now getting, at best, a few billion dollars a year in such aid from rich countries. The $100 billion figure, though included in the 2,500-page main report, was removed from a 48-page executive summary to be read by the world’s top political leaders. It was among the most significant changes made as the summary underwent final review during a days long editing session in Yokohama. The edit came after several rich countries, including the United States, raised questions about the language, according to several people who were in the room at the time but did not wish to be identified because the negotiations are private. The language is contentious because poor countries are expected to renew their demand for aid this September in New York at a summit meeting of world leaders, who will attempt to make headway on a new treaty to limit greenhouse gases. Many rich countries argue that $100 billion a year is an unrealistic demand; it would essentially require them to double their budgets for foreign aid, at a time of economic distress at home. That argument has fed a rising sense of outrage among the leaders of poor countries, who feel their people are paying the price for decades of profligate Western consumption. Those bolds are all mine. And before I elaborate, I have to add that it’s equally disturbing to me that this information came two-thirds of the way into Gillis’s article. Talk about burying the lede — this erasure is the story, but it was relegated to the story’s third act, meaning many people probably won’t read it. Back to the bolds, starting with the last one: Rich countries argue that $100 billion a year to shield poor countries from climate impacts is an “unrealistic demand.” I do not believe that if the World Bank said that Europe and U.S. will be destroyed without $100 billion in aid each year, that this would have been deleted from the IPCC summary. Arguing that they cannot afford to deal with the poor in the way that the world’s lead economists say they need to means rich countries do not truly understand what they’re up against. It means that they believe they will somehow be immunized from the kinds of violent uprisings over food, land, energy, and water that result when the poor — mostly people of color — are left out of the picture. It means they do not get what is already happening in Syria, the Ukraine, Taiwan, Mexico, and the Sudan, where forced massive migration and civil wars have already started over limited resources, arguably the result of climate change’s impacts. When rich countries can edit the poor out of the most important document on the gravest danger facing Earth, it means that they are not serious about addressing climate change. It means that climate mitigation funds will help protect millionaire beachfront condo owners in South Beach, but have yet to address how it will protect what’s left of Geechee families in South Carolina. Perhaps it even means that rich countries think their money is better spent on technology and “innovation” to shield themselves from climate catastrophe. And those tricks very well might shield some people from flooding, but it doesn’t shield the “poorest” from the kind of reckless capitalism that traps them in a perpetual state of vulnerability. This is an insult to nations who even with meager resources have already started making the difficult investments that their wealthier counterparts don’t have the courage to make. “Bangladesh has invested $10 billion of its own money to adapt to extreme climatic events,” said Dr. Camilla Toulmin, director of the International Institute for Environment and Development in a statement on the IPCC report. “Nepal is the first country to develop adaptation plans at the community level. It is time for the richer countries to pull their weight and do the right thing, by investing at home and abroad in actions that can reduce emissions and protect people and property from danger.” There is little today that says whiteness is supreme more than arguing that it is an “unrealistic demand” for nations with predominantly, if not exclusive, white leadership to pay what is necessary to protect the people of Africa, India, and South America from climate calamity they did not cause. The oppression, the bigotry, and the fuckery of that argument is that it allows rich countries to continue perpetuating unrealistic demands on the world’s “poorest” — those who “virtually have had nothing to do with” climate change. Chattel slavery was an unrealistic demand. Putting Latin American workers in the most dangerous farm and factory jobs, exposing them to pesticides, carcinogens, and other toxic elements so that Walmart can have “roll back” prices — these are unrealistic demands. Asking the poorest of communities to fend for themselves against unprecedented waves of heat, drought, and rising sea levels is an unrealistic demand. In my estimation, there are two things that will destroy us eventually if not resolved soon: white supremacy and climate change. These happen to both be things that the wealthy believe they can afford to ignore. It’s for this reason that the IPCC’s summary just may be their infamous last words.Filed under: Cities, Climate & Energy

Continue reading Rich countries: Sure, climate change will screw poor countries, but what about us?

Paris Elects Its First-Ever Female Mayor

Thumbnail

Paris has elected its first-ever female mayor, the Spanish-born Socialist Anne Hidalgo, even as elsewhere in the country more right-wing candidates won their races. Hidalgo received 54.5 per cent of the vote.Read more…

Continue reading Paris Elects Its First-Ever Female Mayor

How to double returns with a P2P ISA

Thumbnail

How P2P ISAs could double your rate of return

Continue reading How to double returns with a P2P ISA

Prices show two-paced housing market

Thumbnail

More evidence of a two-paced housing market has been revealed in property price figures from the Land Registry, with prices in London up 14%.

Continue reading Prices show two-paced housing market

Disguised Taliban fighters die in attack on Afghan election HQ

Thumbnail

Gun and grenade attack in Kabul as insurgents try to disrupt presidential ballot on 5 AprilTaliban fighters who were disguised under burqas stormed the heavily fortified headquarters of Afghan election organisers on Saturday the second suicide attack in Kabul in less than 24 hours, as the country prepares for a crucial but much threatened election.At least three men took over a campaign office of the presidential candidate Gul Agha Sherzai, and used it to fire guns and rocket-propelled grenades over the security forces protecting the Independent Election Commission.

Continue reading Disguised Taliban fighters die in attack on Afghan election HQ

Qatar’s emir to visit cash-strapped Sudan

The emir will visit Khartoum to discuss “bilateral relations” days after UN reports an escalation of violence in Darfur.

Continue reading Qatar’s emir to visit cash-strapped Sudan

How Television Without Pity Shaped Pop Culture

Television Without Pity announced yesterday that the website would be closing up shop on April 4, with the forums going dark in May. The news was met with sorrow and hand-wringing from the TV devout, who were not just saddened that new recaps would cease — which I could tolerate; there … More »

Continue reading How Television Without Pity Shaped Pop Culture

Barack Obama delivers withering civics lesson to Putin over Crimea

Thumbnail

Eschewing sticks and stones, Obama stuck to wounding words: Russia was no longer powerful enough to match the USFacing the biggest punch-up with Russia since the end of the cold war, Barack Obama did what he does best: he came out talking.The former Harvard professor gave class dunce Vladimir Putin a withering civics lesson over his badly thought-through invasion of Crimea. History was on the side of those who believed in individual freedom, universal rights and democracy, he said.

Continue reading Barack Obama delivers withering civics lesson to Putin over Crimea

Abdel Fatah al-Sisi resigns from Egypt military to run for presidency

Thumbnail

Sisi finally confirms long-awaited candidacy promising ‘stability, safety and hope for Egypt’ and he is widely expected to winEgypt’s army chief Abdel Fatah al-Sisi resigned from the military on Wednesday night, paving the way for a long-awaited presidential campaign and a return to strongman leadership for Egypt.”I am here before you humbly stating my intention to run for the presidency of the Arab Republic of Egypt,” Sisi said in a televised statement, still dressed in military fatigues. “Only your support will grant me this great honour.”

Continue reading Abdel Fatah al-Sisi resigns from Egypt military to run for presidency

How Hong Kong’s government subsidises those who need it least

<!– google_ad_section_start –> We hate the poor and favour the rich and well-off. The way our government has favoured our tycoons and helped them to unimagined fortunes is well-known. Far lesser-known is how much we have directly subsidised the middle and upper-middle classes since 2004, mostly through property-related concessions. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

Continue reading How Hong Kong’s government subsidises those who need it least

Shut Up About &#34;Clickbait&#34;

Thumbnail

Ninety-two years ago, a 34-year-old Chicago man named Joseph Wozniak woke up missing one of his balls, which had been surgically removed by hoodlums. Read more…

Continue reading Shut Up About &#34;Clickbait&#34;

Can White Gentrifiers Wear &#34;Chocolate City&#34; Shirts?

Thumbnail

Today, a Washington, DC resident writes into The Root’s “Race Manners” advice column with an important sartorial question. So important that—for the benefit of our vast white readership—we will also attempt to answer it here.Read more…

Continue reading Can White Gentrifiers Wear &#34;Chocolate City&#34; Shirts?

“We’re giving teens a reason to choose us,” said an integrated marketing content director for Coca-C

“We’re giving teens a reason to choose us,” said an integrated marketing content director for Coca-Cola. “It gives teens a reason to reach for a Coke .” Imagine living a life that required you to say those words.Read more…

Continue reading “We’re giving teens a reason to choose us,” said an integrated marketing content director for Coca-C

Workers fear for the future in Ukraine’s heavily industrialised east

Thumbnail

Donbass’s miners and factory workers are justifiably concerned what the geopolitical tug of war means for themStanding outside Donetsk’s coal mine, Igor Yefremov mused over the future of Ukraine’s heavy industry. “If we join the European Union our mines and factories will shut down,” he said. “Already the orders from Russia are drying up. Russia doesn’t want us because of the chaos in Kiev.”Yefremov was waiting to meet his brother-in-law, who was working on the early shift at the city centre mine. Above ground, the scene was tranquil. Off-duty workers sat on benches in a small, sunny rose garden, dwarfed by two giant pit frames.

Continue reading Workers fear for the future in Ukraine’s heavily industrialised east

Ukraine crisis: EU is drafting powerful sanctions against Russia, says Cameron

Thumbnail

PM tells Commons that Brussels has drafted list of strong trade sanctions against Moscow if it intervenes in eastern UkraineA “strong, robust and powerful” package of trade, financial and economic sanctions is being drawn up by the European Union for use if Russia intervenes in eastern Ukraine, David Cameron told MPs.The prime minister was reporting back to the Commons on meetings over the past four days with his EU colleagues and the US president, Barack Obama, in The Hague.

Continue reading Ukraine crisis: EU is drafting powerful sanctions against Russia, says Cameron

Right This Moment, Millennials Are Realizing Politics Is a Sham

Thumbnail

There are a handful of hallmarks of growing up: losing your virginity; getting your first apartment; realizing that America’s two-party political system is a grotesque mockery of democracy. The “millennial” generation is doing all of those things right now. Read more…

Continue reading Right This Moment, Millennials Are Realizing Politics Is a Sham

A new study of elections over the past 25 years shows that “the South was the least hospitable place

A new study of elections over the past 25 years shows that “the South was the least hospitable place for female congressional candidates.” And the most hospitable place for calling losing female congressional candidates “ma’am.” Read more…

Continue reading A new study of elections over the past 25 years shows that “the South was the least hospitable place

Arrested gang believed to have slaughtered ‘more than 10′ wild tigers

<!– google_ad_section_start –> Arrest of gang that slaughtered live tigers from Vietnam reveals secret trade that catered to businessmen and officials in southern Guangdong city <!– google_ad_section_end –>

Continue reading Arrested gang believed to have slaughtered ‘more than 10′ wild tigers

America, Inc. at it’s Finest

Saks Fifth Avenue
7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Bren-Books.com, Modern first editions and collectible fiction<

bren-books.com, Modern first editions and collectible fiction

Almost Naked Elite Brief
US iTunes, App Store, iBookstore, and Mac App Store
Chocolate Artisan Truffles by Just Chocolate

just chocolate truffles
justchocolate.biz

J&R Computer/Music World
Burberry
New July 2013