7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Burberry
US iTunes, App Store, iBookstore, and Mac App Store
7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Rebecca Taylor
7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Saks Fifth Avenue
New July 2013

Here are the fair-trade hipster shoes you’ve been waiting for

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OlibertéForget giving hipster shoes to people in Africa (cough, TOMS). How about giving them jobs? Oliberté is that shoe company — with the added perk of giving you a way to buy your chukka boots and flats with less guilt. OlibertéOliberté bills itself as a fair-trade, sustainable clothing brand based in sub-Saharan Africa, paying its workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, more than double the minimum wage. The factory is the world’s first to be certified by Fair Trade USA. So in addition to fair pay, workers get benefits like 90-day maternity leave, reasonable work hours, no exposure to certain toxic chemicals, and decisionmaking via employee committee. Adds Treehugger: The shoes and bags are made from locally sourced leather, purchased from farmers who raise free-range cattle that typically live six to eight years. The company works with a tannery that is careful not to pollute and recycles its chrome … Although not all of the components are sourced from Ethiopia, the natural rubber used from the soles is also local. They work to make the factory zero-waste, recycling and reusing anything that’s left over from leather scraps to glue cans. And although the shoes aren’t cradle-to-cradle, you can mail ’em back to Oliberté when they’re worn out, and the company will find ways to recycle them. Other than the carbon emissions from shipping shoes halfway around the world — and yeah, that’s a big caveat — they sound pretty spiffy.Filed under: Business & Technology, Living

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Former Israeli PM Ehud Olmert faces jail after graft conviction

<!– google_ad_section_start –> It is the first time a former Israeli premier has been convicted of bribery in what has been called one of the worst corruption scandals in the country’s history. Sentencing will take place later, but legal experts say such a conviction will almost certainly entail time in prison for Olmert. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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Fears rise of bigger quake hitting Puente Hills fault in Los Angeles

<!– google_ad_section_start –> Experts say a bigger earthquake along the lesser-known fault that gave southern California a moderate shake a few days ago could do more damage to the region than the long-dreaded “big one” from the more famous San Andreas fault. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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New international preschool finds pricey space to fill a gap

<!– google_ad_section_start –> With an increasing number of local parents enrolling their children in international schools, two more international kindergartens have set up shop in Hong Kong since the start of the year to cater to the growing demand. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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1,400 homeless in Hong Kong, double government estimate: study

<!– google_ad_section_start –> The number of homeless people in Hong Kong is likely to be double that of previous government estimates, a City University study has found. The university, with the help of three other community organisations, puts the figure at 1,414 – far higher than the government’s last citywide tally of 674 made more than 15 years ago. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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London Crossrail tunnel dig gives insight into Black Plague victims

<!– google_ad_section_start –> A lot can be learned from a tooth. Molars taken from skeletons unearthed during work on a London railway line are revealing secrets of the medieval Black Death – and its victims. <!– google_ad_section_end –>

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Turkey awaits results of local elections

Counting begins across Turkey as polls test Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan’s popularity after a string of scandals.

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Arsenal in title race – Pellegrini

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Manchester City manager Manuel Pellegrini says Arsenal can still win this season’s Premier League title.

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Tensions rise as Myanmar holds census

Buddhist nationalists threaten to boycott tally over fears it could lead to recognition for Rohingyas.

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Gunmen attack Afghan election commission

Four Taliban fighters killed after storming Kabul election commission headquarters, a week ahead of presidential poll.

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Speed Cameras Are Making the City Lots of Money

Bad news for lead-footed drivers: that new speed camera program launched at the beginning of the year seems to be working. Since the January 16 launch of the program, which is intended to cut down on speeding near city schools, the Department of Transportation has handed out 11,715 $50 tickets … More »

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“Each blade takes up to a month to make, comprises as many as 6,000 layers of steel and can slice an

“Each blade takes up to a month to make, comprises as many as 6,000 layers of steel and can slice an onion so thin you can read through it.” But… why?Read more…

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New York City council passes bill to protect unpaid interns’ rights

Bill would guard against sexual harassment and discrimination Mayor Bill de Blasio expected to sign into law this weekOn Wednesday, the New York City council unanimously approved a bill that seeks to protect unpaid interns against sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace. The bill, sponsored by councilman James Vacca, expands the citys Human Rights Law to afford unpaid interns the same protection accorded to paid employees. It is currently awaiting Mayor Bill de Blasios signature, which is expected in the coming days.

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Erdogan’s name and face dominate as Turkey heads to the polls

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The prime minister is not even standing in Sunday’s local elections, but in the divided capital the talk is of no one elseTurkey may be in turmoil and the vast city of Istanbul in ferment, bridling at the antics of a government struggling to cope with scandal and sleaze, but in Kasimpasa quarter, the prime minister’s troubles raise barely a shrug.A conservative, lower-middle-class district bordering the Golden Horn and predominantly inhabited by Turks from the Black Sea coast, Kasimpasa loves Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the powerful prime minister increasingly reviled across Turkey and tarnished internationally.

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David Samson, the 74-year-old chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, has resigne

David Samson, the 74-year-old chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, has resigned. Read more…

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Want to attract a new generation to the national parks? Find a few new rangers.

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Come 2016, the National Park Service will turn 100 years old. In anticipation of the centennial milestone, the agency announced this week a new public engagement campaign to “reintroduce the national parks … to a new generation of Americans.” This is the federal agency responsible for not just Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon, but also the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and Governor’s Island in New York City, which holds the Statue of Liberty. Still, it is having a hell of a time attracting young people to the parks, particularly people of color. Shelton Johnson, an African American ranger at Yosemite National Park in California, talked about the challenge of getting black youth into the great outdoors in Ken Burns’ 2009 PBS documentary, The National Parks: America’s Best Idea. “How do I get them here?” Johnson asked. “How do I let them know about the buffalo soldier history, to let them know that we, too, have a place here? How do I make that bridge, and make it shorter and stronger? Every time I go to work and put the uniform on, I think about them.” Part of the problem is that, despite the mosaic of nationalities of people who’ve frequented the parks, there’s not a lot of people like Johnson putting that uniform on. The staffing at the Park Service has remained perpetually and overbearingly white throughout its century-long history. The National Park Service is among the worst on diversity of all federal agencies. For a read on how the agency’s own employees feel about it, check out the 2013 “The Best Places to Work” report, which scores departments based on the yearly Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey. According to the report, NPS has one of the lowest scores for diversity, ranked number 258 out of 300 agencies scored. For African Americans, it’s ranked 150 out of 195. Numbers I obtained directly from the National Park Service on its staff’s racial composition show why its rankings are so pitiful. Last year’s third quarter statistics show a roughly 82 percent white workforce, with black workers making up just above 6 percent of the staff. For Latino Americans, it’s less than 5 percent; Native American, less than 3 percent. Some might argue that Park Service employees are mostly white because they’re pulled from rural communities that tend to surround national parks. OK, that works for Yosemite. But not for D.C., New York, and the many other urban areas where NPS is represented. A Powerpoint I obtained on the workforce for the National Parks of New York Harbor shows that 87 percent of their seasonal staff and 80 percent of their permanent staff are white. For black and Latino staff, it’s 4 and 8 percent respectively. “We recognize that if our desire is to reflect the face of America, then that face is becoming [less white] so we have our work cut out for us,” says David Vela, an associate director for NPS who handles workforce diversity. “Clearly the agency is very committed to making sure that at every level — from entry-level positions to mid-range to senior management — it has that diversity. Our numbers don’t reflect that. We know that. We own that and we are developing strategies to deal with it.” Vela mentions strategies in place for pipelining college graduates into the fold, for bringing inner-city kids out to NPS’ locations in the wilderness, and even for bringing NPS into the urban wilderness — the agency just wrapped up a pilot academy program in New York City last week. But the numbers certainly don’t show any marked improvement, and I didn’t hear much about how the agency deals with the kind of racism, both explicit and implicit, that keeps people of color in a perpetual status of “minority.” Looking at NPS’ centennial celebration website, under the “visionary leaders” history page, you read about people like President Teddy Roosevelt and Stephen T. Mather, the NPS’ first director. What’s not mentioned is that both men were close friends with — and closely influenced by — Charles M. Goethe and Madison Grant, leaders of both the conservation movement and the eugenics movement. ICYMI, the eugenics movement was a brand of scientific racism that held that people of color were an innately inferior species. These men saw the national parks as refuges for white people. This is the kind of white supremacist history that has to be reconciled before diversity is appropriately addressed in the NPS workforce. That, and the fact that many if not all of these parks were originally the homes of Native Americans. Asked about this, Vela said, “I would say that park superintendents are more empowered today to connect all of the dots, from Civil War to civil rights.” There are some hints of progress. The New York Times ran a fascinating story last month focusing on Park Ranger Jerry Bransford, a tour guide at Mammoth Cave National Park in Kentucky. Throughout the early 1800s, Mammoth served as a labor camp for enslaved African Americans, including Bransford’s great-great-grandfathers and uncles. A few of his ancestors became popular cave tour guides in the 1830s, a professional tradition that was passed down through the Bransford family until 1939, when the federal government nationalized the land for a park. Willie Bransford, who not only ran the cave tours, but also a bed and breakfast above ground, was the last in that succession of Bransfords to run the property. A local news article describes the end of the Bransford era like this, “When the government took over his land and business in 1939, Willie was forced to sell out, ‘Cheap,’ … and was not hired back as a park guide as most white guides were.” Jerry, Willie’s grandson, was able to restore the Bransford line when in, the 1990s, the National Park Service invited him back to work there. It’s the least the NPS could do to make amends for what it took from the black family who served as stewards and shepherds of the Mammoth Cave grounds for so long. But as an African American, Jerry Bransford is more of the exception at NPS than the rule. And much work remains if the agency is going to address its problems around welcoming people of color, both as visitors and as workers. “Sometimes I come here, and I can hear the moans and groans of these Americans,” Bransford told the New York Times, referring to his enslaved ancestors. “And they were Americans, these slaves, fighting for the cause of freedom, something they themselves would not possess for another 60 years.” This is true of many of our national parks, and the least the Park Service can do is have a workforce that reflects this.Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Politics

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America, Inc. at it’s Finest

Saks Fifth Avenue
7 For All Mankind, a division of VF Contemporary Brands
Bren-Books.com, Modern first editions and collectible fiction<

bren-books.com, Modern first editions and collectible fiction

Almost Naked Elite Brief
US iTunes, App Store, iBookstore, and Mac App Store
Chocolate Artisan Truffles by Just Chocolate

just chocolate truffles
justchocolate.biz

J&R Computer/Music World
Burberry
New July 2013